Schedule Appointment

EMPLOYMENT LAW

Assisting Louisiana workers with a range of Employment and Labor law issues, including:

  • Wage and Hour Disputes
  • FMLA cases
  • Retaliation for participating in protected activity
  • Wrongful termination
  • Equal Pay
  • Disability discrimination and disability accommodation (ADAAA)
  • Religious discrimination and accommodation (Title VII)
  • Sexual harassment and pregnancy discrimination (Title VII)
  • Race and national origin discrimination (Title VII)
  • Age discrimination (ADEA)
  • Whistleblower claims

FORMS:

TITLE VII discrimination CLAIMS

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII) makes it illegal to discriminate against someone based on race, color, sex, religion, age or national origin when it comes to any aspect of employment, including hiring, firing, pay, job assignments, promotions, layoff, training, fringe benefits, and any other term or condition of employment. The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit.

Title VII also protects against retaliation and harassment.  It is unlawful to retaliate against an individual for opposing employment practices that discriminate based on race or color or for filing a race, color, or national origin discrimination charge, testifying, or participating in any way in an investigation, proceeding, or litigation under the Title VII.  Harassment is considered illegal when it is so frequent or severe that it creates a hostile or offensive work environment.  The harasser can be the victim's supervisor, a supervisor in another area, a co-worker, or someone who is not an employee of the employer, such as a client or customer.

If you feel you have been a victim of race discrimination, please contact my office for a consultation. 


DISABILITY CLAIMS

Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) makes it illegal to discriminate against a qualified person with a disability in the private sector and in state and local governments when it comes to any aspect of employment, including hiring, firing, pay, job assignments, promotions, layoff, training, fringe benefits, and any other term or condition of employment. Not everyone with a medical condition is protected by the law. In order to be protected, a person must be qualified for the job and have a disability as defined by the law.  The law also makes it illegal to retaliate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination, or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit.

The law requires that employers reasonably accommodate the known physical or mental limitations of an otherwise qualified individual with a disability who is an applicant or employee, unless doing so would impose an undue hardship on the operation of the employer's business.  Undue hardship means that the accommodation would be too difficult or too expensive to provide, in light of the employer's size, financial resources, and the needs of the business. The law also protects people from discrimination based on their relationship with a person with a disability (even if they do not themselves have a disability).

If you feel you have been a victim of workplace discrimination, please contact our office for a consultation. I can explain your rights and options.


pregnancy claims

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act makes it illegal to discriminate against a woman because of pregnancy, childbirth, or a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth. The law forbids discrimination based on pregnancy when it comes to any aspect of employment, including hiring, firing, pay, job assignments, promotions, layoff, training, fringe benefits, such as leave and health insurance, and any other term or condition of employment.  If a woman is temporarily unable to perform her job due to a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth, the employer or other covered entity must treat her in the same way as it treats any other temporarily disabled employee. This may include providing light duty, alternative assignments, disability leave, or unpaid leave to pregnant employees if it does so for other temporarily disabled employees.

Additionally, impairments resulting from pregnancy may be disabilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).  An employer may have to provide reasonable accommodations, absent undue hardship. Pregnant employees may have additional rights under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA.

If you feel you have been a victim of workplace discrimination, please contact our office for a consultation. I can explain your rights and options.


WAGE CLAIMS

Our office is experienced with handling various wage and hour claims including:

·       Unpaid overtime

·       Misclassified positions

·       Failure to pay

·       Wrongful termination

·       Improper compensation

·       Minimum wage matters

If you feel you have a wage and hour issue, please contact our office for a consultation. 


WHISTLEBLOWER CLAIMs & RETALIATION

 

As an employee, you have a right to make complaints or report unlawful activity, discrimination, harassment and other unlawful conduct you encounter in the workplace.  If your employer has retaliated against you or terminated your employment for reporting or threatening to report unlawful behavior in the workplace, you may have cause for legal action. 

This retaliation can take many forms, including:

  • Demotion
  • Discipline
  • Harassment
  • Denial of opportunity for advancement
  • Relocation to undesirable locale
  • Wrongful termination
  • Other negative consequences

If you feel you have been a victim of unlawful employer retaliation, please contact my office for a consultation.  I can explain your rights and options.